Marcin Dudek - Steps and Marches

A solo exhibition at Edel Assanti gallery

 

From 22 September
Edel Assanti gallery
74a Newman Street
W1T 3DB London
FREE


Marcin Dudek works with objects, installations, collage and performance, touching upon questions regarding control in society, the hierarchy of power, and mechanisms of violence as seen from sociological, historical, and psychological standpoints. Steps and Marches is a culmination of his
extensive research into theories of crowd control, including topics such as police riot techniques, architectural approaches to prison or stadium building, and mass manifestations. Dudek’s analytical and field research builds on autobiographical archives and experiences. The exhibition takes place at Edel Assanti (London) and Harlan Levey Projects (Brussels) expanding on two prior exhibitions in each gallery. Works in the exhibition demonstrate the relationship between one and many in a cross-chunnel dialogue.

The London exhibition dives into the march of mass movements, whilst the Brussels chapter zooms in on the steps of individuals who shaped those spectacles. In Belgium, works include sculptural and video portraits as well as architectural interventions. The stadium is presented in mid-collapse,
populated by individual works referring to specific histories of its fall. Centerfold in London is a monumental installation comprised of freestanding geometric MDF blocks, each referencing specific historic crowd disasters through statistical representation. Monitors embedded within
this modular landscape play looped black and white footage, alternating between exercises in coordinated demonstrations and violent explosions of crowd violence. Inanimate sculptural objects – melted rubber bullets, disfigured stadium chairs, damaged mirrors – punctuate the installation,
construed from materials that evidence these same disasters or authoritative bodies’ attempts to curtail them. These materials directly relate to the individual narratives illustrated in Brussels. The walls are painted orange, reminiscent of Dudek’s performance “Saved by an Unseen Crack” at Harlan
Levey Projects (2015), which gently forced the crowd into a family friendly reenactment of the Heysel disaster on its 30th anniversary, as well as the artist’s more violent assault on himself in “We Stumbled as We Clambered”
at Edel Assanti later the same year. 

Polish Cultural Institute
Copyrights © 2009-2017 Polish Cultural Institute. All rights reserved