Poland On Screen

The great celebration of Polish Cinema - 49 films seen in seven programmes at the Picturehouse Cinemas in London

 

 

 

14th October - 1st December 2011

Exclusively at London Picturehouses

What is that Poland on the screen like? How was it described by the censorship‑constrained artists of the Communist era? And how is it seen by the younger generation of post-liberation filmmakers?

Opening night film: Małgorzata Szumowska's "33 Scenes from Life", winner of the Special Jury Prize at the Locarno Film Festival, with the filmmakers in attendance.

PROGRAMME: 

INTIMATE CINEMA

Once portrayed so masterfully by Krzysztof Kieślowski, witness the basic human concerns to which Polish cinema has returned in recent years.

1. 33 Scenes from Life - director: Małgorzata Szumowska, 2008, 95'
2. A Few People, a Little Time - director: Andrzej Barański, 2005, 105'
3. Saviour's Square - director: Krzysztof Krauze, 2006, 105'
4. Tricks - director: Andrzej Jakimowski, 2007, 95'
5. Time to Die - director: Dorota Kędzierzawska, 2007, 104'
6. Zero - director: Paweł Borowski, 2009, 110'
7. Sweet Rush - director: Andrzej Wajda, 2009, 83'

POLES AGAINST POLES

Like all families, we have had - and still have - our differences; it is only against a common enemy that we have readily united. Internal struggle - both with and without a foe to face - is a theme approached by many filmmakers.

1. Blind Chance - director: Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1981, 112'
2. Custody - director: Wiesław Saniewski, 1983, 118'
3. Interrogation - director: Ryszard Bugajski, 1982, 111'
4. Mother of Kings - director: Janusz Zaorski, 1982, 127'
5. Colonel Kwiatkowski - director: Kazimierz Kutz, 1995, 123'
6. Escape from The ''Liberty'' Cinema - director: Wojciech Marczewski, 1990, 87'
7. Snow White and Russian Red - director: Xawery Żuławski, 2009, 108'

PLAYING WITH FORM

Polish cinema has often been streets ahead of global cinematic trends. Our third cycle offers a handful of examples from a variety of different genres and periods.

1. Hands Up! - director: Jerzy Skolimowski, 1967, 76'
2. Everything for Sale - director: Andrzej Wajda, 1968, 94'
3. The Third Part of The Night - director: Andrzej Żuławski, 1971, 101'
4. Illumination- director: Krzysztof Zanussi, 1972, 87'
5. The War of the Worlds: Next Century - director: Piotr Szulkin, 1981, 92'
6. Farewell to Autumn - director: Mariusz Treliński, 1990, 98'
7. Reverse - director: Borys Lankosz, 2009, 96'

PO-LIN MEANS POLAND

Home to many Jews before WWII, Jewish culture has long been engrained in the national heritage of Poland, and Jewish themes - particularly the suffering of Polish Jews - form a recurring feature of Polish filmmaking.

1. Po-Lin. Slivers of Memory - director: Jolanta Dylewska, 2008, 82'
2. Austeria - director: Jerzy Kawalerowicz, 1982, 102'
3. The Promised Land - director: Andrzej Wajda, 1974, 140'
4. Unloved - director: Janusz Nasfeter, 1965, 79'
5. Korczak - director: Andrzej Wajda, 1990, 113'
6. The Pianist - director: Roman Polański, 2002, 142'
7. How Far, How Near - director: Tadeusz Konwicki, 1971, 93'

IN THE BEGINNING THERE WAS THE WORD...

Descended from a proud national literary heritage, Polish film has always nourished itself on great literature, with the involvement of writers having a profound influence on our filmmaking culture.

1. The Depot of the Dead - director: Czesław Petelski, 1958, 104'
2. Mother Joan of the Angels - director: Jerzy Kawalerowicz, 1960, 103'
3. The Hour-Glass Sanatorium - director: Wojciech Jerzy Has, 1973, 119'
4. Fever - director: Agnieszka Holland, 1980, 116'
5. Valley of the Issa - director: Tadeusz Konwicki, 1982, 102'
6. Weiser - director: Wojciech Marczewski, 2000, 96'
7. Pornography - director: Jan Jakub Kolski, 2003, 117'

REALITY BITES

Historically confined to allegory, Polish cinema has always had a love of metaphors - but with the end of censorship has come a freer embrace of realist depictions of life, as recent examples testify.

1. The Debt - director: Krzysztof Krauze, 1999, 97'
2. Hi, Tereska - director: Robert Gliński, 2001, 86'
3. Edi - director: Piotr Trzaskalski, 2002, 98'
4. Day of the Wacko- director: Marek Koterski, 2002, 93'
5. The Dark House - director: Wojciech Smarzowski, 2009, 105'
6. Reserve - director: Łukasz Palkowski, 2007, 100'
7. Mother Theresa of Cats - director: Paweł Sala, 2010, 95'

LOVE, THE POLISH WAY

A universal subject, not always as light as it may seem. See how Polish filmmakers, too, have tackled romantic entanglements.

1. How to Be Loved - director: Wojciech Jerzy Has, 1962, 97'
2. Chronicle of Amorous Accidents - director: Andrzej Wajda, 1985, 114'
3. A Short Film About Love- director: Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, 83'
4. Szamanka- director: Andrzej Żuławski, 1996, 112'
5. Love Stories - director: Jerzy Stuhr, 1997, 87'
6. Louise's Garden - director: Maciej Wojtyszko, 2007, 105'
7. All That I Love - director: Jacek Borcuch, 2009, 91'

For the screenings schedule please visit: www.polandonscreen.pl


Project organised by the Krakow Film Foundation as part of the Polish Presidency of the EU Council programme

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